On the Radar: The “Acoustic Mirrors” of Denge–a Pre-Radar Warning System

Located along British coastlines, parabolic concrete structures such as these once served as interwar, pre-radar warning systems. They focused and concentrated sounds from the Channel, with the goal of detecting the approach of enemy planes. Image: Wikipedia. Read more here: Acoustic Mirror - Wikipedia, and the succeeding radar system: Chain Home - Wikipedia

Why (Almost) Every State Has a Train Car From the French

In February of 1949, four years following the end of World War II, an exciting shipment arrived in New York City's harbor. A ship bearing the words, "MERCI AMERICA," came to port where thousands of on-lookers gathered to see the freighter's cargo. The Magellan carried 49 boxcars filled to the brim with gifts of gratitude …

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On the Radar: Chernobyl control room, then and now

The once model nuclear city marked the 1986 disaster's 30th anniversary last year. This is an eery comparison of a reactor control room, before and after. Source: Found on Pinterest. A combination of photos from different, unknown photographers. For more pictures of Chernobyl and Pripyat, check out Elena Filatova's site and Ukraine's Chernobyl museum page. …

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How Backwoods North Carolina Became the Frontier of the Avant-Garde

What do Robert De Niro's dad, Cy Twombly, and Robert Rauschenberg have in common? If you answered "Black Mountain College," you'd be correct. They and many other artistic greats of the mid-20th century attended or taught at the progressive institution created by four educators who were dismissed from Rollins College for their unconventional teachings and …

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On the Radar: Louis Armstrong serenading his wife on the Giza Plateau, 1961

Want to know more about this iconic photo? Read up on how jazz greats spread American culture to countries across the world as part of a United States' Cold War ambassadorial mission at: OpenCulture Vintage Everyday Or, read a book about it: Satchmo Blows Up the World: Jazz Ambassadors Play the Cold War by Penny …

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Corned Beef: smuggled aboard Gemini III & other oddities

Corned beef might just have a more illustrious history than many famous figures. The earliest noted reference to the meat dates to the 12th century, when it was called the "demon of gluttony" in an Irish poem about a king who gorges himself on corned beef. The personified "demon" beef goes so far to say …

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